Everything I always wanted to ask about Grape-Nuts



My son Ben gave me the above advertisement, which he found at a garage sale. (Thanks, Ben!) The plastic sheet that protected the ad is labeled 1920s. I have a bowl of sturdy, appetizing Grape-Nuts almost every morning, so this ad has found a good home.

I’m wondering: this scene carries a sexual implication, doesn’t it? The locked eyes seem to bespeak a desire for more than cereal. But does “Only time for Grape-Nuts” mean that there’s no time for more than breakfast, or does it mean that time already spent in the bedroom has left no time for a more elaborate breakfast? It’s possible of course that this ad might only be a comment on modern times and the death of cooking. The locked eyes though suggest more.

And who are these people anyway? Are they both headed off to work? (Would a woman have dressed in this way around the house?) If the couple are a husband and wife, why is he dressing next to what looks like a single bed? And why is his coat hanging on a chair?

[Readers of a certain age will recognize in this post’s title a play on the title of David Reuben’s book Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) (1969).]

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Everything I always wanted to ask about Grape-Nuts