Jack Cheng:

That’s what most people do. They keep waiting and waiting until they have enough saved up, find the right idea or until they’re in a position with more responsibility. But conditions are never perfect. And when we’re so focused on our plans, we lose sight of the openings in front of us. Instead of plans we need habits. Habits of taking risks. Habits of keeping our eyes open for new opportunities. Habits of putting ourselves in situations that force us to grow and change. We can all introduce a little chaos into our lives.

Holy Hanna, what a sweaty male armpit of a show. Average age, I’d say, at a guess, was in the late 30’s, early 40’s. Older, balding, grizzled, overweight, zombified manboys in t-shirts and faded old clothes, shambling, ghoulish prospectors of dead dreams and junk, panning about with their crumpled want lists and thumb oil-soaked notebooks of who to hit up for what drawing or signature or who to browbeat into a 2-out-of-3 falls Texas Submission Monologue Death Conversation Match.

2 VMWare Fusion tips

I’ve enjoyed having VMWare Fusion on my MacBook, as it’s made the transition from a PC to a Mac easier. Also, since I now have only the MacBook, I’m able to easily duplicate what I had on the old PC and to edit work documents on my copy of Microsoft Office. But I hit a few roadblocks the other night (on deadline, of course), so thought I’d document their solutions here.

  • I had installed a lot of Windows apps and got the warning that there was only about 1GB of hard drive space left on the virtual disk. I thought I’d allocated enough room, but 10GB wasn’t enough. I went into Fusion’s Settings and allocated 20GB. No dice. Still didn’t work. But this excellent tutorial video on the Fusion site shows step-by-step how to create a virtual disk that will grow as the VM grows.
  • I’d hoped to save my files in one place only on my Mac, and not have to store files in both my Mac and Windows environments. But from within Windows, opening those shared folders was painfully slow and so I reconciled myself to having two separate sets of files to manage. BUT. A search through the VMWare Fusion Forum offered a user’s solution that hit the nail on the head: the Avast anti-virus software in Windows was causing the slowdown. Add the Fusion shared folders to Avast’s exclusion list so it doesn’t attempt to scan any files it finds there. With that setting in place, opening Mac files from within Windows is as quick as opening them from the Finder. At last, I can have one set of documents in one place.
  • No better time to promote Joe Kissell’s newest e-book, Take Control of VMware Fusion 2. These Take Control books are inexpensive and the best way to get acquainted with Macs.
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You just can’t fight “conformity” by indulging the evil pleasure of enjoying your conformity to a small tight-knit group of “non-conformists.” All this does is promote some groups at the expense of other groups, and poisons your mind in the process. It is like fighting “loyalty” by dogged devotion to an anti-loyalty alliance.

Best to clear your mind and emotions of group loyalties and resentments and ask, if this belief gave me no pleasure of rebelling against some folks or identifying with others, if it was just me alone choosing, would my best evidence suggest that this belief is true? All else is the road to rationality ruin.

It’s not for others to recognize the fruits of your work; it’s for yourself. The desire is to complete a thought. So then … you can go on and find a new one to torment yourself with. The intellectual torment … is … fun? Hmmmm. Difficult to say. Perhaps it is a kind of acquired taste for an odd pleasure.

… I see a world that really did change dramatically over the last century, but where progress on many fronts (like transportation and energy) seems to have slowed down rather than sped up; a world quickly approaching its carrying capacity, exhausting its natural resources, ruining its oceans, and supercharging its climate; a world where technology is often powerless to solve the most basic problems, millions continue to die for trivial reasons, and democracy isn’t even clearly winning over despotism; a world that finally has a communications network with a decent search engine but that still hasn’t emerged from the tribalism and ignorance of the Pleistocene. And I can’t help thinking that, before we transcend the human condition and upload our brains to computers, a reasonable first step might be to bring the 18th-century Enlightenment to the 98% of the world that still hasn’t gotten the message.

Like virtue, poetry is its own reward. … The immortality game, like that of getting into the circle of the two hundred, can be wicked and delusionary. … That leaves you with perhaps the most important reward of all: personal satisfaction. … You are more likely to succeed at poetry, as in love, if you get success out of your head. Concentrate on quality. Learn the joy of creating excellence — whether or not anyone else recognizes it.

We all know the one about the Emperor walking around with nothing on, while everyone admires the finery of his garments – garments so fine that only really clever and smart people like investment bankers can see them. The rest of us thought that debt, was, well, debt, but the bankers said no, debt is asset. It’s just that we couldn’t see it because we were so stupid…

Yes, we need to stabilise our present situation, and then, perhaps, we could ask a really simple question – far too simple for the clever people – what is money for? At least that way it stops being an end in itself.

Then, the best thing of all – coming home in the dead of night to this beautiful place where there are no lights and no noise, and where the dog, the cats, the owls, the foxes, the badgers and the stars are more or less where I left them.